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2011-12 Environmental Analysis Curriculum - Claremont Colleges Library

Curriculum map created by Sean Stone and Char Booth of the Claremont Colleges Library to support research instruction integration with the 5-Colleges Environmental Analysis program. This map displays degree requirements, courses, clubs & organizations, and Library resources associated with this subject area across the Claremont Colleges for the 2011-12 academic year. It was compiled using public information drawn from Colleges websites, course schedules and catalogs, and the Claremont Colleges Library website.

Clubs & Organizations

Cultivating Dreams

5C Outdoor Women Leaders

Students for the Bernard Field Station

CMC

Students Promoting Environmental Action and Responsibility (SPEAR).

Harvey Mudd

Engineers for a Sustainable World and Mudders Organizing for Sustainability Solutions (ESW/MOSS).

Pitzer

Green Bike Program.

Pomona

Green Bikes. The Ralph Cornell Society: Native Plants. President's Advisory Committee on Sustainability (PACS). Pomona for Environmental Activism and Responsibility (PEAR). ReCoop/ Clean Sweep. Sustainability Integration Office.

Scripps

Environmental Club.

EA Landscapes

Pomona Organic Farm

Library Plots (MuddBrary)

Bernard Field Station

Bernard Field Station in CCDL.

Firestone Center

John R. Rodman Arboretum

Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gardens (RSABG)

Classes

CMC. Harvey Mudd. Joint Science. Pitzer. Pomona. Scripps. Govt. Post. Soc. Bio. Chem. EA. Phys. Anth. EA. Econ. Hist. Ont. EA. Geol. Phil. Anth. Engl. Poli. Hist. Econ. Rlst. EA. Govt 111 Politics and Population. Govt 112 Public Policy Process. Govt 118 The Processes of Environmental Policymaking. Govt 119 Introduction to Environmental Law and Regulation. This course will introduce students to the rise of global environmental governance, examine specific environmental issues and international treaties (such as the Convention on Biological Diversity and Kyoto Protocol), analyze the politics around the international policy process, and explore how global environmental governance intersects with geopolitics, conflict and national security. Fall, B. Sarathy.. Govt 120 Global Environmental Politics and Policy. This course will introduce students to the rise of global environmental governance, examine specific environmental issues and international treaties (such as the Convention on Biological Diversity and Kyoto Protocol), analyze the politics around the international policy process, and explore how global environmental governance intersects with geopolitics, conflict and national security. Fall, B. Sarathy.. Govt 144 Political and Social Movements. Post 114 Comparative Environmental Politics. P. Steinberg. Post 140 Global Environmental Politics. Soc 180 Tropical Forests: Policy and Practice. Bio 43L Introductory Biology. Fall. Bio 44L. Introductory Biology. Spring. Bio 64L. The Living Sea. Fall. Bio 104 Conservation Biology. G. Fowler. Bio 138L Applied Ecology and Conservation with Lab. Bio 145 Evolution. Fall, D. McFarlane. Bio 146 Ecology. Fall, D. McFarlane. Bio 154 Animal Behavior. Fall, D. Guthrie. Bio 159 Natural Resource Management. Spring, E.Morhardt. Bio 165 Advanced Topics in Environmental Biology. Bio 166 Animal Physiological Ecology. Bio 169L Marine Ecology. Spring, Staff. Bio 175 Applied Biostatistics. Bio 176 Tropical Ecology. Spring, D. McFarlane. Bio 180L Neotropical Ecology.. (See Pitzer in Costa Rica Program) C. Baduini, D. McFarlane. Bio 187P Special Topics in Biology: Herpetology. Chem 70L Land, Air and Ocean Science. K. Purvis-Roberts. EA 30L. Science and the Environment with Laboratory. Ms Purvis-Roberts. (An EAP Introductory Core Course) An examination of the physical, biological, and chemical functioning of the Earth's surface environment, including energy and matter flux, positive and negative feedbacks of importance, the nature and dispersal of key pollutants, and prospects for bioremediation. Basic analytical techniques for water and air samples explored, using local field areas. Each semester. (Taught at Joint Science.). Phys 79L. Energy and the Environment. Fall. Anth 12 Native Americans and Their Environments. S. Miller. Art 103 Environments Workshop. K. Miller. Anth 110 Nature and Society in Amazonia. L. Martins. Anth 164 North American Archaeology. S. Miller. Anth 168 Humans and Their Environments: The Prehistoric Perspective. Spring, S. Miller. EA 10. Introduction to Environmental Studies. This course, required for the Environmental Studies major, is an interdisciplinary examination of some of the major environmental issues of our time. This course explores aspects of society's relationship with environment using the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. Topics include: environmental ethics and philosophy; ecosystems, biodiversity, and endangered species; North/South environmental conflicts; air pollution and acid rain; ozone depletion; climate change; biotechnology; and international environmental policy. R. Hazlett, M. Herrold-Menzies.. EA 20 Environmental Values, Literature, and Current Affairs. A study of select current topics in the environmental field as informed critically by environmental history, literature, justice, and values. C. Miller.. EA 27 Cities by Nature: Times, Place, Space. C. Miller. EA 30L Introduction to Environmental Science. K. Purvis-Roberts, G. Fowler. EA 39 Environments, Arts and Action. (See Art 37). Spring, K. Miller. EA 46 Environmental Awareness and Responsible Action. A course facilitated by advanced Environmental Studies majors in conjunction with the professor. We examine lifestyle choices and campus policies in relation to waste management, water usage, energy conservation, and plant and animal habitat. The course is designed to help students understand the pervasion and significance of ecological problems, as well as their causes and solutions. Theoretical investigations of biodiversity, sustainability, bioregionalism, environmental philosophy, and other topics will provide the foundation for informed action in which students will participate in addressing environmental issues at the Colleges and beyond. P. Faulstich.. EA 48 A Sense of Place. A 'sense of place' begins with interactions between people and the world, and develops from the environment within which humans exist. The course engages students in the creative and intellectual process of developing an understanding of critical connections between person and place; between who we are and where we are. P. Faulstich.. EA 63 Exhibiting Nature. An exploration of how natural history and anthropology museums, botanical gardens, zoos, national parks, and the like present a view of nature and human societies. Enrollment is limited. Field trip fee: $40. P. Faulstich.. EA 65 Visual Ecology. This course explores how ecological insights, issues, and concerns are investigated, illuminated, and manipulated through visual media. Examples include nature photography (both fine art and documentary), documentary films, and photographic essays. Spring, P. Faulstich.. EA 68 Ethnoecology. This course investigates the ecological priorities and concepts of various peoples, from so-called "fourth world" hunters and gatherers to "first world" scientists. What we isolate and consider as ecological knowledge includes those aspects of culture that relate to environmental phenomena directly (e.g., resource exploitation) and indirectly (e.g., totemic proscriptions). Thus, this ecological knowledge affects subsistence and adaptation. Ethnoecology--the study of cultural ecological knowledge--begins, like the science of ecology itself, with nomenclatures and proceeds to considerations of processes. In this course we study beliefs about the relationship between humans and the environment as expressed in both Western science and the traditions of Native peoples, and we explore where these cultural systems of knowing intersect and diverge. Spring, P. Faulstich.. EA 72 Protecting Nature: Parks, Conservation Areas & People. EA 74 California’s Landscapes: Diverse Peoples and Ecosystems. Explores the diverse ecological and cultural landscapes of California, examining how different groups (Native American, Hispanic, African-American, Asian, and European), have transformed California's rich natural resources. Topics include: Native Americans of the Los Angeles Basin and the Redwood Forests; Spanish-Mexican missions of southern California; African-American miners in the Sierra; Chinese and Japanese farmers in the Central Valley; and the wildland-urban interface of LA. Course fee $30 for two required Saturday field trips. M. Herrold-Menzies.. EA 86 Environmental Justice. Is environmental harm distributed in a fundamentally racist manner? How do we adjudicate such claims? In this course, you will actively learn to analyze environmental issues using an environmental justice lens, evaluate the race and equity implications of environmental harms, and be inspired to do something about environmental injustice. Fall, B. Sarathy.. EA 90 Economic Change and the Environment in Asia. EA 95 U.S. Environmental Policy. How is U.S. environmental policy formulated and how does it relate to social, historic, and political dynamics? This course argues that the "standard model" of direct provision of government services has been substantially unraveling due to a series of new trends in policy including: greater public involvement, devolution, and dispersion. Spring, B. Sarathy.. EA 98 Urban Ecology. Urban ecology is a subfield of ecology that deals with the interaction between humans and the environment in urban settings. This course brings together concepts and research from diverse fields to explore themes of environment and cityscape, relationships between industrialization, green space, and health, ecological challenges in rapidly urbanizing areas, and global social movements toward sustainable cities. A key objective of the course is to consider urban environments through their dynamic relationships to social, political, and economic systems with a key focus on globalization and public life. Spring, S. Phillips.. EA 101 Environmental Internships. The environmental internships course engages students in real-world environmental challenges. Students work with local nonprofit, for-profit, governmental, or non-governmental organizations, contributing to efforts in environmental justice, conservation, green architecture and planning, agroecology, public policy, and education. Students critically study topics associated with their internship sites, as well as learning the ethics and practice of respectfully engaging local communities. The course requires a weekly commitments of ten to fifteen hours. Spring, S. Phillips.. EA 104 Doing Natural History. The interdisciplinary field of Natural History links the natural sciences to the humanities and social sciences by combining ecological field studies with drawing and painting, cultural history, and social analysis. This course introduces students to the complicated history of natural history and the rich botanical and wildlife studies that naturalists have completed, while having students actively doing natural history themselves at the Pitzer Arboretum and Bernard Field Station. One Saturday field trip is required. Fall, M. Herrold-Menzies.. EA 120 Global Environmental Politics and Policy. EA 124 Protecting Nature: Parks, Conservation Areas & People. Creating parksand conservation areas is one major way that governments and nongovernmental organizations attempt to protect endangered species and biodiversity. In this class we will examine a variety of protected areas, conflicts around these areas, and programs designed to reduce these conflicts. We will use the Bernard Field Station as a central case study. This course includes a social responsibility component. Spring, M. Herrold-Menzies.. EA 125 Power and Social Change. "Power to the people!" "Knowledge is power." "Taking power." What exactly does one mean by power and how may altering power relations lead to social change? This course will critically examine different theories of power, the relationship between power and violence and how power can be used to liberate as well as dominate and manipulate. This course introduces students to interdisciplinary fields and movements, such as Marxism, feminism, postmodernism, anti-colonial and postcolonial movements and grassroots movements. B. Sarathy.. EA 130 Human Ecology in the Neotropics. (See Pitzer in Costa Rica Program.) P. Faulstich, M. Herrold-Menzies.. EA 131 EEP Clinic (See Science 137). E. Morhardt. EA 137 Plant Classification and Adaptations to the Environment. Plant identification is used as the basis for learning fundamentals of plant diversity, classification, and adaptations. Topics addressed include fire ecology, effects of increasing carbon dioxide levels, impacts of agriculture, conservation, and other subjects relevant to interactions of human populations with the plant world. Classes include frequent field excursions. Spring, Professor S. Morhardt.. EA 140 The Desert as a Place. An interdisciplinary investigation of the desert environment as a place with some emphasis on Australia and the American Southwest. Correlations between natural and cultural forms, histories, materials, motives, and adaptations will be studied. Topics to be considered will include structural and behavioral adaptations in the natural and cultural ecologies; climate, geomorphology and architectural form; taxonomy, desert flora and fauna and 122 Environmental Analysis their cultural uses; and various ramifications of the interaction between the desert ecology and cultural consciousness in arid zones. Enrollment is limited. Course fee: $40 (for field trips).Spring, P. Faulstich.. EA 141 Progress and Oppression: Ecology, Human Rights, and Development. This class is concerned with the state of tribal peoples and ethnic minorities around the world. Particular attention is given to environmental problems and their effects on diverse peoples. We explore case studies of the cultural and environmental consequences of rainforest destruction, tourism, energy development, national parks, and war. We critique programs to assist oppressed peoples and the environments which sustain them. Participants are asked to choose a geographical, cultural, and topical area and make recommendations particular to the problems and the needs of that region. P. Faulstich.. EA 144 The Political Economy of Global Production and Natural Resources. This course critically engages relations between labor and the environment by examining the political economy of various natural resources in both domestic and global production processes. We will also evaluate race, class and gender dynamics within production processes and evaluate their implications for social and environmental justice. Spring, B. Sarathy.. EA 146 Theory and Practice in Environmental Education. Students are trained in principles of environmental education, and serve as instructors to children from elementary schools in Pomona and Claremont. Participants work in teams to develop and teach effective environmental curricula at the Bernard Biological Field Station. In addition to teaching environmental ethics, local ecology, and critical ecological concerns, course participants serve as role models of environmental sensibility and community involvement. Enrollment is provisional until after the first class meeting when course applications are distributed. P. Faulstich.. EA 147 Community, Ecology, and Design. This course is geared toward envisioning and creating an ecological future. We study aspects of community planning, architecture, urban design, and transportation in an exploration of alternatives to current patterns of social living. Combining ecological design principles and social concerns, this course offers environmental perspectives, concrete examples, and practical experience for making our communities socially healthy and ecologically benign. Fall, P. Faulstich.. EA 149 Ecology and Culture Change. This course studies relationships between changing natural systems and changing socio-cultural systems. We will investigate the approaches to ecological and social dynamics (change, degradation, evolution, revolution), with a focus on the factors which link ecological and human processes. Theoretical and applied perspectives on change will be studied at both the micro and macro levels. Emphasis will be placed on evaluating and understanding how peoples create and respond to change. Global issues of ecology and intercultural communication will guide our inquiries. Fall, P. Faulstich.. EA 150 Critical Environmental News. A seminar examination of how environmental issues are portrayed in the news media. Specific issues will be determined by the current news, but general concerns include representation of the environment, habitat destruction, consumerism, development, environmental justice, politics and the environment, local and global topics, media bias, and environmental perception. Fall, P. Faulstich.. EA 152 Nature through Film. We examine how ideas about nature and the environment and the human-nature relationship have been explored in film. From wildlife documentaries, to popular dramas of environmental struggles, to cult classics and Disney's animated visions of nature, the human-nature relationship has been depicted through film to transmit particular views of the world, especially certain constructs concerning gender, race and ethnicity. We view and study films, read relevant theory, and actively critique ways in which our worldview has been shaped and impacted by cinema. Students write 8 five-page papers during the semester. Fall, P. Faulstich and M. Herrold-Menzies.. EA 154 The Political Economy of Global Production and Natural Resources. This course critically engages relations between labor and the environment by examining the political economy of various natural resources in both domestic and global production processes. We will also evaluate race, class and gender dynamics within production processes and evaluate their implications for social and environmental justice. B. Sarathy.. EA 162 Gender, Environment & Development. Examines the intersection of theories of environmental degradation, economic development and gender. Social theories to be examined include: modernization theory, dependency and world systems, women in development vs. women and development, cultural ecology, eco-feminism, political ecology and feminist political ecology, gender and the environment, and population. Men are warmly welcomed to enroll! Spring, M. Herrold-Menzies.. EA 179 Worldview and Natural History. This seminar strives to increase understanding of how worldviews are situated in the landscape, and how indigenous cosmologies function as storehouses of critical knowledge of the natural world. Students will engage in substantive, collaborative research on a selected topic. Areas of focus include symbolic systems, traditional ecological management, Aboriginal Australia, and Botswana. Fall, P. Faulstich.. Econ 172 Environmental Economics. Spring, M. Federman. Hist 16 Environmental History. A. Wakefield. Ont 101 Critical Community Studies. Fall/Spring. S. Phillips. Ont 104A/104B Social Change Practicum. Fall/Spring. T. Hicks.. Ont 106 Applied Qualitative Methods. Fall, T. Hicks/Spring, S. Mayo. EA 10. Introduction to Environmental Studies. Mr. Hazlett, Mr. Fowler, Ms. Herrold-Menzes. (An EAP Introductory Core Course). Examines the history of environmental change over the past century, the environmental ramifications of economic and technological decisions, lifestyles and personal choice and the need to evaluate environmental arguments critically. Each semester. (Taught at Pitzer and Pomona).. EA 20. Nature, Culture and Society. Mr. Miller.(An EAP Introductory Core Course) This required class for all EA majors and minors is especially designed for sophomores and juniors. It will employ case studies to help analyze some key contemporary environmental dilemmas. Topics will vary, but will draw on an interdisciplinary array of sources in the humanities and social sciences, including history, philosophy and literature; religion, art, politics and sociology. Each fall.. EA 27. Cities by Nature: Time, Space and Place. Mr. Miller. A cross-cultural, multi-continental examination of urbanization from the ancient world to the present, exploring the changing nature of urban life and its rituals and the impact urban development has had upon environmental systems, and political, social and economic structures. Each fall.. EA 30. EA 80. Classical Readings in Environmental Studies. Mr. Elderkin. Critical reading from and development of considered personal reaction to a collection of well-known and broadly respected environmental writings ("classics") of a wide variety of authors in the humanities, natural sciences and social sciences, including Carson, Cather, Colburn, Dillard, Leopold, Nash, Thoreau, Williams and Wilson. Each spring.. EA 85. Farms and Gardens. Mr. Hazlett. An introduction to agroecology, (the ecology of agriculture), including a component of directed field work at the Pomona Organic Farm. Topical matter includes soils and nutrient cycling, tillage, planting, horticulture and harvesting and a look at alternative, non-industrial food production systems. Each spring.. EA 91. Air Pollution: History and Policy. Dr. Francisco Donez (EPA). EA 100 LJS. Global Climate Change. Professor Branwen Williams. The Global Climate Change course will provide an introduction to earth science including past and present global climate change. In particular, we will focus on understanding how our earth works as a system, how climate has changed on geologic timescales, and what global changes have occurred in the recent past. The course will include a lab component, discussion of journal literature and media topics relevant to climate change, and a short presentation. Prerequisites are one year of intro science (either physics, biology, chemistry, or AISS). EA 170. U. S. Environmental History. Mr. Miller. An examination of the idea of nature and wilderness in American history, from colonial visions to contemporary ideologies. It will draw from the work of Henry David Thoreau, John Muir and Mary Austin; Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson and Michael Pollan, as well as environmental documentaries and material culture. Each spring.. EA 171. Water in the West. Mr. Miller. Explores how communities, states and the federal government developed the legal precedents, physical infrastructure, financial mechanisms, environmental engineering, political will and social desire for the construction of a hydraulic empire in the Trans-Mississippi West. Each spring.. EA 172. Crisis Management: Public Lands and American Culture. Mr. Miller. This seminar assesses the history of public-lands in the U.S. since the late nineteenth century, and the environmental, legal, political, and cultural forces that have shaped the federal land-management agencies' often-controversial operations on the national forests, parks and grasslands. Topics will include, among others, these bureaus' intellectual origins; political histories; fire-management practices; and the social pressures and environmental dilemmas that have shaped their actions. Next offered spring 2011.. EA 180. Green Urbanism. Mr. Bardacke, Mr. Wells. A discussion-based seminar restricted to senior EA majors. The incorporation of nature into urban design; a reassessment of traditional notions about the interrelationship of the built and natural environments with a look at environmental architecture exemplified by Green Corps, LEED, and other radical initiatives. Each fall.. EA 190. EA Senior Seminar. Mr. Hazlett, Mr. Miller. A capstone, modular-based seminar in which senior majors focus their various curricular backgrounds on environmental issues and problems, including projects of practical nature developed by the College's Sustainability Integration Office. Exchange of interdisciplinary perspectives is encouraged throughout, with participants learning intensively from one another in the process of undertaking research. Simulates "real world" team-based investigations. Each spring.. EA 191. Senior Thesis in Environmental Analysis. Mr. Hazlett, Mr. Miller. Production of a senior research paper or project which culminates in a professional-quality public presentation. Open to senior EA majors only. Each fall.. EA 191H. Senior Thesis in Environmental Analysis. Mr. Hazlett, Mr. Miller. Same as 191, but taken in both semesters of the senior year for half-credit each semester; grade and credit awarded at the conclusion of the second semester.. EA 99/199. Reading and Research. Staff. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 99, lower-level; 199, advanced work. Course or half-course. May be repeated. Each semester. (Summer Reading and Research taken as 98/198). Geol 2 Environmental Geology. Geol 125L Earth History with Laboratory. Phil 36 Values and the Environment. A. Davis. Phil 38 Bioethics. A. Davis. Anth 54 Human Interactions with Preindustrial Environments. J. Perry. Anth 129 Native California. J. Perry. Engl 57 Gender and Nature: Environmental Literature. T. Clark. Poli 60 Global Politics of Food and Agriculture. H. Williams. Poli 136 The Politics of Environmental Action. R. Worthington. Hist 100 Water in the West. C. Miller. Hist 189 US Environmental History. C. Miller. Econ 127 Environmental and Natural Resource Policy. B. Cutter. Econ 128 Energy, Economics and Policy. Rlst 166A Divine Bodies: Religion and the Environment. Z. Kassam. EA30L Science and the Environment. This course is an introduction to the basic principles of environmental science with application in chemistry, ecology, and geology, and is part of the core course requirements for the Environmental Analysis major. Topics covered include a discussion of ecosystems, climate change, energy and food production, land resources, pollution, and sustainable development. A full laboratory accompanies the course and will include an emphasis on introduction to Geographical Information System (GIS) mapping and analysis. Enrollment limited to 24. K. Purvis-Roberts..

EA Abroad

Australia. Costa Rica. Ecuador. New Zealand. South Africa. Tanzania.

Degree Requirements

CMC. Harvey Mudd (Off Campus Major). Pitzer. Pomona. Scripps. Environmental Analysis. Environment, Economics, and Politics (EEP). The major requires a minimum of fifteen courses, in addition to the college's general education requirements.. Major Requirements = Pitzer. Student must also complete a minor in one of the Harvey Mudd College major-granting departments, along with all other graduation requirements, including the Common Core, the Integrative Experience, and the program in Humanities and Social Sciences.. All students taking off-campus majors will be required to write a senior thesis or engage in some approved capstone experience (e.g., research, Clinic, internship). In cases where courses in the off-campus major overlap with either or both of the HMC humanities and social sciences concentration or the HMC minor, up to four overlapping courses may be allowed to satisfy more than one of these departmental graduation requirements. Students are not allowed to seek off-campus majors that are offered as on-campus majors.. HMC Center for Environmental Studies. Environment & Society Track. Environmental Policy Track. Environmental Science Track. Custom Track. Major. Minor. Environmental Science (Pre-Designed). Environmental Policy (Pre-Designed). Society and the Environment (Pre-Designed). Senior Capstone (1 of 2). EA: Science. EA: Policy. EA: Environment & Society. Students who are particularly interested in human ecology, indigenous studies, or art and the environment may pursue this version of the major through Pitzer College.. Core Requirements. Topic Courses (6 courses): one from each of the following 6 groups. EEP majors must complete either a senior thesis in Biology (Biology 190L, Biology 188L-190L, Biology 189L-190L, or Biology 191) or X 190. Senior Thesis. For further information, see “General Education Requirements” and “Senior Thesis in Science.”. Core Courses. 6 Track-related Courses (including 1 additional natural science course and 1 environmental policy course). Environmental Internship. Capstone Seminar: Critical Environmental News. Core Courses. 6 Track-related Courses (including 1 statistics course—e.g economics statistics, quantitative methods in Sociology, or other appropriate statistics course as approved by student’s advisor— and 1 course outside of the policy sciences). Environmental Internship. Capstone Seminar: Critical Environmental News. Core Courses. Introductory Biology: Bio 43L, Bio 44L. Introductory Chemistry: Chem 14L, Chem 15L or Chem 29L. The requirement for Introductory Biology and Introductory Chemistry may be met by completion of both semesters of the Accelerated Integrated Science Sequence (AISS). 1 Earth Sciences Course. 5 Upper-Division EA Science Courses, including one in ecology (Bio146L, Bio169L, or equivalent). Students must take at least one class in statistics or the application of quantitative methods to environmental problems. This requirement may be satisfied by taking an approved class with a quantitative focus as one of the five upper-division EA science courses. Alternatively, students may take an approved non-science course in statistics in addition to the other major requirements.. 1 Environmental Policy Course – e.g., EA 95; EA 120; HM POST 114. Environmentally focused study abroad semester strongly recommended. Senior Thesis/Capstone. Environmental Science Concentration. Society & Environment Concentration. Senior Capstones. a) Senior thesis (EA191) is currently optional, but all students are strongly advised to complete one. It is traditionally a fall-semester project, and if a student achieves an A in the course he or she will be considered for Honors. In special circumstances the thesis can be extended to a year-long course. b) All seniors are required to successfully complete the senior seminar (EA 190) in the spring semester, which is framed around a major team-based, client-driven project. Those students who do not write a thesis must write a separate, significant paper for this class.. Introductory Core: EA 10, 20, 30. Four other environmentally-focused courses selected in consultation with their advisers. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20, and EA 30. Biology 44L, Introductory Biology. Chemistry 14L and 15L, Basic Principles of Chemistry. 6 upper division courses must be chosen in consultation with an adviser, including:. An environmentally-focused Off-Campus Study program is strongly recommended. Subtopic. Introductory Core: EA10, EA20, and EA30. The following must be chosen in consultation with an adviser:. Subtopic. Introductory Core: EA10, EA20, EA30. The following must be chosen in consultation with an adviser:. An internship (summer internship, approved independent study, etc.). Senior Thesis/Capstone. A one semester thesis, Biol/Chem/Phys 191 (Fall) plus EA 191,Senior Environmental Seminar (Spring). Subtopic. Introductory Core. Introductory Biology. Introductory Chemistry. The requirement for Introductory Biology and Introductory Chemistry may be met by completion of both semesters of the Accelerated Integrated Science Sequence (AISS). 1 earth sciences course– e.g., PO Geol 20x; must be chosen in consultation with an adviser. 5 upper-division EA science courses, including one in ecology (Bio146L, Bio169L, or equivalent); must be chosen in consultation with an adviser. 1 upper-division policy course – e.g., Econ 171; Gov 118; must be chosen in consultation with an adviser. •Senior Thesis/Capstone [either a one-semester thesis, Bio/Chem/Phys 191 (Fall) and Environmental Analysis Senior Seminar, PO EA 190 (Spring), OR a two-semester thesis, Bio/Chem/Phys 188L–190L or 189L–190L. Core Requirements. Topic Courses (6 courses): one from each of the following 6 groups. Students must complete a Senior Thesis/Capstone of either a one-semester thesis and Environmental Analysis Senior Seminar, PO EA 190 (Spring), OR a two-semester thesis; the one- or two-semester thesis must be in a department approved by the EA Steering Committee.. Core Courses. 6 Track-related Courses (including 1 additional natural science course and 1 environmental policy course). Environmental Internship. Capstone Seminar: Critical Environmental News. Biology 43L-44L. Introductory Biology. Chemistry 14L-15L. Basic Principles of Chemistry, or Chemistry 29L. The introductory courses in biology and chemistry may also be completed by both semesters of the Accelerated Integrated Science Sequence. Biology 137. EEP Clinic. Economics 86. Accounting for Decision Making. Economics 101. Intermediate Microeconomics. Economics 171. Environmental and Resource Economics. Economics 120. Statistics, or Mathematics 31. Calculus II, or Biology 175. Biostatistics. Economics 102. Intermediate Macroeconomics, or Economics 104. Foundations of Political Economy, or Economics 167. Law and Economics. Biology 146. Ecology, or Biology 159. Natural Resource Management, or Biology 169. Marine Ecology. Government 50. Introduction to Public Administration, or Government 121. Organization and Management. Government 111. Politics and Population, or Government 118. The Processes of Environmental Policymaking, or Government 144. Political and Social Movements. Government 119. Introduction to Environmental Law and Regulation, or Government 120. Environmental Law. EA 10 Introduction to Environmental Studies. EA 86 Introduction to Environmental Justice. EA 30L Introduction to Environmental Science. An Ecology course. EA 10 Introduction to Environmental Studies. EA 86 Introduction to Environmental Justice. EA 30L Introduction to Environmental Science. An Ecology course. EA 10 Introduction to Environmental Studies. EA 20 Environmental Values, Literature, and Current Affairs. EA 30L Introduction to Environmental Science. Environmental Science. Environmental Biology. Environmental Chemistry. Environmental Analysis in Geology. Mathematical Issues for Environmental Analysis. Environmental Physics and Engineering. Custom Track. Environment and Society. Environmental Design. Environmental Ethics. Human Behavior and the Environment. Environmental Policy. Society, Development and the Environment. Race, Class, Gender and the Environment. Custom Track. Design with your advisor your own Course Plan, including 7 but not exceeding 11 courses total, in addition to the Core and Capstone courses. Individually designed course plans must show depth in some foundational discipline, or set of closely related disciplines, and must be approved by the Steering Committee.. At least 1 policy course. At least one Earth Sciences course, e.g., GEOL 20 PO. Biology 146L, Biology 169L, or equivalent ecology course. At least 1 EA-Economics course. One upper division ecology course (i.e., Biology 146L, Biology 169L, or an equivalent course. Five EA-Policy courses. An upper division ecology course (eg. Biol 146L, Biol 169L or equivalent). At least one EA-policy course. Five EA-society courses. EA 10. EA 20. EA 30L. Bio 43L. Bio 44L. Chem 14L. Chem 15L or Chem 29L. Biology 43L-44L. Introductory Biology. Chemistry 14L-15L. Basic Principles of Chemistry, or Chemistry 29L or EA 10, EA 20, and EA 30L. The introductory courses in biology and chemistry may also be completed by both semesters of the Accelerated Integrated Science Sequence. Biology 137. EEP Clinic; Students may petition to substitute an upper-division elective approved by the EA Steering Committee for Bio 137 (EEP Clinic). Economics 86. Accounting for Decision Making. Economics 101. Intermediate Microeconomics. Economics 171. Environmental and Resource Economics. Economics 120. Statistics, or Mathematics 31. Calculus II, or Biology 175. Biostatistics. Economics 102. Intermediate Macroeconomics, or Economics 104. Foundations of Political Economy, or Economics 167. Law and Economics. Biology 146. Ecology, or Biology 159. Natural Resource Management, or Biology 169. Marine Ecology. Government 50. Introduction to Public Administration, or Government 121. Organization and Management. Government 111. Politics and Population, or Government 118. The Processes of Environmental Policymaking, or Government 144. Political and Social Movements. Government 119. Introduction to Environmental Law and Regulation, or Government 120. Environmental Law. EA 10 Introduction to Environmental Studies. EA 86 Introduction to Environmental Justice. EA 30L Introduction to Environmental Science. An Ecology course. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). Introductory Biology: BIOL 41E. Introductory Chemistry: CHEM 1A or CHEM 51. One from Physical Geography (in development) or Geology 20. One from PHYS 17; or new HMC energy course (in development). Five from upper-division science courses within a single department. One upper-division policy course – e.g., ECON 52; ECON 127. One class in Environment and Society – e.g. PHIL 37; 38; 49; RLST 166A. Environmentally focused study abroad semester strongly recommended. Senior Thesis/Capstone. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). BIOL 40 PO, Introductory Genetics with Laboratory. BIOL 41E PO, Introductory Ecological and Evolutionary Biology. BIOL 104 PO, Conservation Biology. Choose three from: BIOL 112 PO, Advanced Animal Ecology with Laboratory; BIOL 116 PO, Ecology and Evolution of Plants; BIOL 131 PO, Invertebrate Biology with Laboratory; BIOL 132 PO, Vertebrate Biology with Laboratory; BIOL 144 PO, Comparative Endocrinology; BIOL 189L PO, Emerging Infectious Diseases. CHEM 1A/B or 51 PO, General Chemistry. CHEM 110 A/B PO, Organic Chemistry (one semester). ECON 52 PO, Microeconomics. Choose one from: ECON 128 PO, Energy Economics and Policy; ECON 125 PO, Natural Resource Economics and Policy; ECON 127 PO, Environmental Economics; GOVT 119 CM, Introduction to Environmental Law and Regulation; EA 172 PO, Crisis Management: National Forests and American Culture. Choose one from: GEOL 20A PO, Introduction to Geology: Geohazards; GEOL 20B PO, Introduction to Geology: Planetary Geology; GEOL 20D PO, Introduction to Geology: Paleontology and the Evolution of Earth’s Biosphere; GEOL 20E PO, Introduction to Geology: Oceanography. Senior Thesis/Capstone. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). CHEM 1A/B, General Chemistry or CHEM 51, Accelerated General Chemistry. CHEM 110 A/B, Organic Chemistry. CHEM 158B, Physical Chemistry. CHEM 161, Advanced Analytical Chemistry with Lab. Choose one: CHEM 70L JS, Land, Air and Ocean Science; CHEM 106, Environmental Chemistry. PHYS 41 & 42, General Physics. Choose one: BIOL 40, Introductory Genetics with Laboratory; GEOL 20, Introduction to Geology. MATH 30, Calculus I. MATH 31, Calculus II. ECON 52, Microeconomics. Senior Thesis/Capstone. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). Choose one introductory geology course: GEOL 20A PO, Geohazards; GEOL 20B PO, Planetary Geology; GEOL 20D PO, Paleontology and the Evolution of Earth’s Biosphere; GEOL 20E PO, Oceanography. GEO 125 PO, Earth History. Choose two: GEO 115 PO, Hydrogeology; GEO 111 PO, Looking at the Earth: Using GIS and Images from Space to Explore Our Environment; GEO 117 PO, Mineralogy with Laboratory; GEO 123 PO, Neotectonics; Any other Geology courses numbered 110-127 excluding 125. Choose two: GEO 181 PO, Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology with Laboratory; Looking Into the Earth: An Introduction to Geophysics; Sedimentology with Laboratory; Structural Geology with Laboratory. Principles of Microeconomics. Choose one: Energy Economics and Policy, Natural Resource Economics and Policy, Environmental Economics. Choose three: other environmentally-focused courses (no geology courses; maximum of 2 courses in natural sciences). Senior Thesis/Capstone. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). Basic Math (2 courses): MATH 32 or 107 (Multi-variable or Vector Calculus) and 60 (Linear Algebra). Basic environmentally-related economics (2 courses): ECON 52 (Microeconomics) and ECON 125 (Natural Resource Economics and Policy) or 127 (Environmental Economics). An approved experience in data analysis (1 course): MATH 58, 58B, 150, 154, 155, 156, 158 or 159. Competence with differential equations (1 course): MATH 102. Additional advanced coursework in math with relevance to environmental analysis (2 courses) chosen, e.g., from: MATH 136 (Complex Variables and Integral Transforms) 151 (Probability) 150 (Clinical Trials) 152 (Statistical Theory) 154 (Nonparametric Analysis) 155 (Time Series),156 (Stochastic Processes) 158 (Linear Models) 159 (Advanced Topics in Statistics) 183 (Mathematical Modeling) 187 (Deterministic Operations Research). Math and Biology Subtrack. Math and Economics Subtrack. Math and Geology Subtrack. Other Subtrack. Senior Thesis/Capstone. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). PHYS 70, 71, 72, or PHYS 41, 42, General Physics with Laboratory. PHYS 101, Atomic and Nuclear Physics with Laboratory. PHYS 190, Senior Seminar. MATH 31, Calculus II. MATH 32, Calculus III, or 107, Vector Calculus. MATH 60, Linear Algebra. ECON 52, Microeconomics. One from: PHYS 128, Electronics with Laboratory; 174, Contemporary Experimental Physics; or an approved HMC ENGR 111, Engineering Clinic. One from: PHYS 175, Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics; CHEM 158 B, Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics; or HMC ENGR 82, Chemical and Thermal Processes. One from: ECON 127, Environmental and Natural Resource Policy; ECON 128, Energy Economics and Policy; or PZ ECON 172, Environmental Economics. Two courses in consultation with adviser, e.g.; HMC ENGR 59, Introduction to Engineering Systems; CS 51, Introduction to Computer Science with Laboratory; CHEM 1A,B, General Chemistry; or CHEM 51, Accelerated General Chemistry. Senior Thesis/Capstone. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). BIOL 41E or BIOL 104. Five from ANTH 59, 124, 129, 145; ENGL 157; EA 27, 85; PHIL 37, 38, 49; POLI136, 139; RLST 166A, SOCI 55, 162. One from POLI 60, 61, 136, 139; EA 171. One additional upper-division class related to Environment and Society chosen in consultation with advisor. Environmentally focused study abroad semester strongly recommended. Senior Thesis/Capstone. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). Perception—two classes. Representation-two classes. Built landscapes—one class. Political terrain—one class. Engineered space—one class. Internship—one, in an area relevant to the track, with advisor approval. Senior Thesis/Capstone. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). Choose one: Introduction to Philosophy (PHIL 07 PZ); Problems of Philosophy (PHIL 01). Choose one: Ethical Theory (PHIL 32); History of Ethics (PHIL 31). Choose one: Human Interactions with the Pre-Industrial Environment (ANTH 54); Values and the Environment (PHIL 36); Environmental Ethics & Public Policy (EA 130 PZ). Choose two: Bioethics (PHIL 038); Religious Ethics (RS 40); Philosophy of Science (PHIL 103 PZ). Choose one: Environmental Science (BIOL 62L JS); Introductory Geology (GEOL 20). Choose one: Ecology (JS BIOL 146L); Introductory Biology (BIOL 40 and 41E; 1 or 2 courses). Choose one: Environmental Awareness and Responsible Action (EA 46 PZ), Progress and Oppression: Ecology, Human Rights and Development (EA 141 PZ). Choose four: Other environmentally-focused courses chosen in consultation with advisor (two cannot be in philosophy or religion department courses). Senior Thesis/Capstone. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). One from: GEOL 20 series, Introduction to Geology; JS BIOL 62, Environmental Science. JS BIOL 146L, Ecology or BIOL 40 and 41E. ECON 52, Microeconomics. ANTH 145, Cultural Ecology. Three courses from each of the following two groups (but at most two from any single department):. One from: BIOL 104, CHEM 106, EA 85, JS BIOL 156, JS CHEM 70, JS BIOL 109, PHYS 17. Senior Thesis/Capstone. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). Introduction to American Politics (POLI 3 PO). Choose one: Policy Implementation and Analysis (POLI 135 PO), Politics of Environmental Justice (POLI 136 PO). Choose four: Introduction to Environmental Law and Regulation (GOVT 119 CM), Environmental Law (GOVT 120 CM), Environmental and Natural Resource Policy (ECON 127), Energy Economics and Policy (ECON 128), Crisis Management: National Forests and American Culture (EA 172), Water in the West (EA 171), Global Environmental Politics (POST 140 HM), Comparative Environmental Politics (POST 114 HM), Global Politics of Food and Agriculture (POLI 60), Political Economy of Development (POLI 178), Freedom, Markets and Well-Being (PPE 160), Politics of Water (EA 171 PZ), Theory and Practice in Environmental Education (EA 146 PZ), Population, Health and Environment (SOC 55), Mapping Inequality (SOC 162). Choose one: JS BIOL 146L or BIOL 40 and 41E. Choose one: Natural Resource Economics and Policy (ECON 125 PO), Energy Economics and Policy (ECON 128 PO), Environmental Economics (ECON 127 PO). Three classes chosen in consultation with advisor. Senior Thesis/Capstone. All of the courses in one of the following groups:. JS BIOL 146L; or BIOL 40 and 41E. Three courses chosen in consultation with adviser. Introductory Core: EA 10, EA 20*, EA 30L (*EA 20 may be substituted for by ANTH 145; PHIL 36; ENGL 159; RLST 166A; or GERM 170.). Introduction to Gender and WomenÌs Studies (GWS 26 PO). Choose one: Asian American Experiences (ASAM 101), Introduction to Black Studies (BLCK 10 PZ), Introduction to Chicano/a Studies (CHST 60 PO). Choose one: Environmental Science (BIOL 62L JS), Introductory Geology (GEO 20 PO). Choose one: JS BIOL 146L or BIOL 40 and 41E. Choose four: Human Interactions with the Pre-Industrial Environment (ANTH 54), The Seacoast in Prehistory (ANTH 124), Native California (ANTH 129), Economic Development (ECON 126), Urban and Regional Economics (ECON 153), The Economics of Gender and the Family (ECON 121), Nature and Gender: Reading Environmental Literature (ENGL 157), Cities by Nature: Time, Space, Place (EA 27), Values and the Environment (PHIL 36), Global Politics of Food and Agriculture (POLI 60), Politics of Environmental Justice (POLI 136), Race, Class and Power (POLI 44), Politics of Community Design (POLI 139), Gender, Environment, and Development (EA 162 PZ), Progress and Oppression: Ecology, Human Rights, and Development (EA 141 PZ), Ethnoecology (EA 148 PZ), Population, Health and Environment (SOC 55), Mapping Inequality (SOC 162). Four courses chosen in consultation with advisor. Senior Thesis/Capstone. BIOL 40 and 41E, or JS 44 and 146L. One from: BIOL 104, 112, 116, 131, 132, 144, or 189L. Choose 3 from: ECON 101, 126, 127, 128, 154, 159, 160; POLI 178; PZ ECON 172; PZ ENVS 141 (Note: selected courses may not overlap requirements above.). A course from the GEOL 20 series. One of GEOL 110, 115, 125. One additional geology course of choice. Other program of study, pre-approved by petition which demonstrates combined environmental and mathematical engagement.. ART 5, Drawing I. ART 20, Photography. ART 25, Sculpture I. PZ ART 037, Environments, Arts and Action. ART 105A, Drawing II. ART 126, Sculpture II. PZ ENVR 48, A Sense of Place. IMS 49, Introduction to Media Studies. ARHI 51A,B,C, Introduction to the History of Art. ARHI 148, Theories of the Visual. ARHI 178, Black Aesthetics and the Politics of (Re)presentation. ARHI 185, History of Photography. SC ARI 188, Representing the Metropolis. EA 27, Cities in Nature. ARHI 73 The Medieval and Renaissance City. EA 85, Farms & Gardens. ARHI 179 Modern Architecture: City, Landscape, Sustainability. POLI 35, City of Angels, City of QuartzPOLI 36, Urban Politics and Public Policy. POLI 139, Politics of Community Design. SC POLI 187A, Urban Politics: Political Power in American Cities. SC POLI 187L, Los Angeles: Politics, History and Culture. SC POLI 187P, Political Geography: Politics in Space and Place. HM ENGR 4, Introduction to Engineering Design. PHYS 17, Physics in Society: Energy Policy; or JS PHYS 079L Energy and the Environment. HM IE 170, Building Los Angeles. Policy and Economics sub-track: ECON 127, 128; HM POST 179; POLI 60, 136; PZ ENVS 33, 141, 147; SOC 55, 162. Values, Motives and Attitudes sub-track: ANTH 124, 129; EA 80; ENGL 157; HIST 127; PHIL 36; PPE 160; PSYC 78, 54; PZ ANTH 164, 168; PZ ENVS 148; RLST 166A. POLI 5; 60; 136; 178; SOC 55 or 162. ECON 52; 126; 127 or 128. ANTH 59; 124;128;145.

Outcomes

Research Instruction Rubric Map. Research Guides. Thesis Meetings. Assessment. Senior Theses in Scholarship @ Claremont. Course-Specific. Disciplinary. Faculty Feedback. EA 172. EA 191 (Thesis). EA 10. EA 20. EA 30. EA 172. EA 191 (Thesis). EA 190 (Projects). Environmental Analysis. Char Miller on Library Collaboration. Char Miller on Curriculum Mapping.